According to Several Studies, Alcoholism is on the rise over the Years. So, how exactly do you know whether you’ve had too much to drink?

Alcoholism is a severe form of alcohol abuse. This disorder is affecting more Americans and becoming an epidemic that needs immediate addressing.

Many people don’t realize that they have become alcoholics until it’s too late. The transition from alcohol use to high-risk drinking to alcoholism is quite gradual. There are also a fair amount of functional alcoholics in society. It can be difficult to detect the disorder in these individuals. They remain competent and capable while alcohol secretly takes over their lives.

How and when can someone know that they are having more than they should, or they are drinking too much?

Regular User Asked on October 3, 2018 in Alcohol.
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3 Answer(s)

Someone had too much to drink when the capacity to function as a normal human being are absent, when mental and physical abilities are very limited or nil. Like drug use, drinking alcohol can be a social statement or an addictive behavior. Like drugs, alcohol can kill. I never knew that alcohol could destroy a normal human being to the point of death. I experienced it first hand with a colleague of mine who didn’t particularly drink until he drank himself to death in virtually 9 months. From a perfectly non-alcohol drinking healthy and happy person to drinking 2 bottles of red wine a day and die in 9 months. I saw the downfall and unfortunately, there was nothing I could do. He was such a nice person. It still gives me nightmares.

It was very sad, specially for his family. God bless him.

Super User Answered on October 4, 2018.
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With alcohol being more easily accessible, anyone can grab a drink after work at a bar, a pub or at a liquor store. It’s even easy for young teenagers to get ahold of alcohol. Statistics show that 72% of teenagers who drink alcohol get it for free from family members or friends, at parties or from stealing it.

Transitioning from normal drinking to High Risk Drinking

No one bats an eye anymore at drinkers. Movies, shows and social norms have made drinking a normal part of society. So, it’s no wonder why alcohol use can transition to high-risk drinking fairly quickly.

For males, high-risk drinking is having more than 1 to 2 drinks every hour or a total of 4 to 5 drinks in one night. For females, having more than 1 drink per hour or a total of 3 to 4 drinks in one night constitutes as high-risk drinking. High risk drinkers are individuals who exceed these limits at least once a week in the prior 12 months. This can lead to an array of temporary side effects. Regular high risk drinkers may develop certain permanent ones.

How you know you’ve had too much

Alcohol tolerance varies in each individual. Different amounts will have different physical effects on each person. While this is true, the brain and nervous system impairment usually starts to kick in after having 2 to 3 drinks.

Alcohol consumption causes a slurring of speech, drowsiness and emotional changes. These signs are normal and expected after several drinks. Some symptoms are dangerous. They show an excess amount of blood alcohol level.

Common signs of excess alcohol intake include:

  • Vomiting and nausea
  • Inability to control bladder and bowel movements
  • Inability to remember any memory of events that unfold, also known as blackouts
  • Temporary loss of consciousness
  • Coma and death from alcohol poisoning

The symptoms of high-risk drinking results in poor decision making abilities. Only time can absolve binge drinking. The liver takes one hour to metabolize each ounce of alcohol, but the liquor can remain in your bloodstream for up to 12 hours.

Warning Signs of Alcoholism

The rate at which alcoholism is increasing is troubling. As more people drink recreationally to blow off the steam, distinguishing who is afflicted by alcoholism can be difficult. It’s much easier to notice warning signs in loved ones than in yourself. Common rudimentary signs of alcoholism include, but are not restricted to:

  • Experiencing cravings related to drinking
  • Continued drinking even when the drinking was causing depression and anxiety
  • Struggling to withdrawal symptoms, like restlessness, nausea or sweating
  • Avoiding hobbies and previously pleasurable activities in favor of drinking
  • Needing to drink more and more to feel the effects of the alcohol

As dependence worsens, the symptoms worsen. At the final stage, also known as the conclusion stage, physical symptoms become excruciating. It becomes difficult to hold food down. Users also often experience inconsolable tremors throughout the day.

Many people don’t realize that they have become alcoholics until it’s too late. The transition from alcohol use to high-risk drinking to alcoholism is quite gradual. There are also a fair amount of functional alcoholics in society. It can be difficult to detect the disorder in these individuals. They remain competent and capable while alcohol secretly takes over their lives.

Olivier says he lost a friend to alcoholism, I had an uncle (its a miracle he’s still alive), but he can’t do anything before drinking whether morning, afternoon, or evening. When he drinks, he can’t eat food, bathe, or do anything responsible, I guess he’s still alive because so many people care about him, they force him to eat, bathe him forcefully, otherwise, he became “useless” and mostly “a nuisance” to the community. Alcoholism is indeed very dangerous. These are effects on an alcoholic’s health, but the effects on his loved ones, family and relatives are even quite extensive. There’s no actual benefit in high risk drinking, for teens, this is a high way you don’t want to take, it’s fun getting started, but may be impossible to get back. Make prudent decisions!

Moderator Answered on October 5, 2018.
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Wow! Thank you so much for sparing time to answer this question. I’m sorry Olivier about your friend, and Moderator about your uncle – I hope he gets treatment or better, recover from his condition. But way I see it, it seems the journey towards recovery is not a so-easy one. Thanks again for your advice!

– Charles.

Regular User Answered on October 6, 2018.
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